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Case studies

Ten Priorities. One Future.

Local action

Our approach to sustainable development is to set out an overall framework but to give our operations the flexibility to implement programmes that best meet their local circumstances.

View the case studies below to see how we implement our 10 sustainable priorities locally.

Farmers working in a field

El Salvador: Supporting 300 small and micro-scale entrepreneurs in El Salvador

Couple enjoying a beer

This year 300 entrepreneurs graduated from Industrias La Constancia's capacity-building programme, Progresando Juntos ('Growing Together'), which aims to support micro and small-scale enterprises – one of the most important sectors in El Salvador´s economy.

A core focus of the programme is Retailer Support, an eight-month module created in 2010 in partnership with FUNDES (a Swiss NGO specialising in small business development) to provide training and technical assistance in how to run a successful store, cafeteria or small restaurant. The majority of participants are women, many of whom have had difficulty finding jobs and want to establish their own business and earn an income for their family.

Read more about Supporting 300 small and micro-scale entrepreneurs in El Salvador

Ghana: Cassava beer launched in another African country

Man drinking an Eagle beer

Building on the success of the world's first commercial-scale, cassava-based clear beer in Mozambique in 2011, Accra Brewery Limited (ABL) in Ghana has launched its Eagle cassava beer.

Cassava has traditionally been seen as a subsistence or emergency crop with almost no commercial development. In Ghana, there is an estimated 40% surplus each year, partly because there is little opportunity for farmers to sell cassava in commercial markets. Addressing the issue, ABL teamed up with DADTCO (Dutch Agricultural Development and Trading Company) and Cassava Processing Ghana Limited to design a mobile processing unit that travels to the cassava-growing regions and processes the root on site – so making it possible to use cassava commercially:

In the first year, ABL worked with over 1,500 smallholder farmers in this way. The launch of Eagle will allow farmers to generate income and reduce cassava surpluses. In the long-term it will contribute to Ghana's agricultural development and economic growth and offer consumers an affordable alternative to informal alcohol.

Peru: Economic development through support for cultural heritage

People talking in a group

In Peru, Backus y Johnston works to promote tourism in Quispicanchi province near Cusco. The project will run in partnership with the German development agency, GIZ, over three years and aims to boost employment and tourism in the region. The focus is on three main areas – the development of training and technical assistance for the handicraft industry, food and beverages, and local leadership.

This programme won the 11th contest of the National Fund for Job Training and Job Promotion (FONDOEMPLEO) and was selected for the programme of private public projects organised by GIZ in cooperation with the Peruvian-German Chamber of Commerce.

USA: Empowering innovative urban businesses

Tap the Future USA

Since 1999, Miller Lite's Tap the Future programme formerly known as the MillerCoors Urban Entrepreneurs Series, has awarded nearly US$2 million in grants and given hundreds of aspiring urban entrepreneurs the tools to grow their businesses.

For the first time this year MillerCoors gave consumers the chance to vote for their favourite urban entrepreneur. The new Consumer's Choice Award allowed finalists to use their social networks to win a business development grant of US$10,000. The winners were Gabriel Muñoz and Raul Duran who run Hispanic Employee Recruiting Online, an innovative website bringing together diversity-friendly companies with good quality, bilingual candidates in the Midwest.

Zambia: Supporting young entrepreneurs

Zambian Breweries has joined the International Labour Organisation (ILO) in a 60 million Kuatcha (US$ 11.43 million) project to develop youth entrepreneurs in the Copperbelt Province. The project aims to discourage long-term dependency and to give aspiring entrepreneurs the support they need to start their own business. 30 people participated in the first phase of the project.

Under the collaboration, the ILO provides technical support and training for young entrepreneurs through three youth organisations in the Copperbelt Province – Roan Youth in Luanshya, Mackenzie Youth in Ndola and Yew Tree Youth at Mindolo Ecumenical Foundation in Kitwe. Zambian Breweries will provide the start-up capital in the form of trading facilities and soft drinks.